Monday, June 13, 2016

Canadian Week in Review 13 June 2016


I have come across the following Canadian genealogy, history and heritage websites, social media, and newspaper articles this past week that were of interest to me, and I thought you might be interested in them, too. 

Social Media 

(Partly Audio) Tree-ring expert uses attic beams to date historic Sackville homes 

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/new-brunswick/ben-phillips-tantramar-heritage-sackville-1.3614284 

Conservation biologist Ben Phillips has been spending a lot of time lately in dusty attics and dank basements in the Sackville area. 

(Photos) Town commemorates 150th anniversary of the Battle of Ridgeway 

http://www.forterietimes.ca/2016/06/04/town-commemorates-150th-anniversary-of-the-battle-of-ridgeway 

The community came together Saturday to commemorate the 150th anniversary of the Battle of Ridgeway. 

The event is considered to be one of the defining battles in Canada history. 

(Video) Royal Newfoundland Regiment Museum opens at CFS St. John's 

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/newfoundland-labrador/royal-newfoundland-regiment-museum-opens-1.3621764 

Lines of faded military uniforms and memorabilia related to the Royal Newfoundland Regiment were unveiled at a new museum in Pleasantville in St. John's Wednesday. 

Newspaper Articles 

Newfoundland and Labrador 

Remote Sensing Satellite Uncovers Astonishing New Evidence of Viking Presence in Newfoundland, Canada 

http://www.ancient-origins.net/news-history-archaeology/remote-sensing-satellite-uncovers-astonishing-new-evidence-viking-presence-020860#sthash.VWzpAdOe.dpuf

Read about William James Veall, and his work on the 'Stream Drift Chart', and his belief that “voyagers from Greenland to Newfoundland almost certainly made use of the Labrador Current which, when ocean currents were favorable, would drift them past the very rugged and somewhat inaccessible rocky coastline of northern Newfoundland right into the mouth of the more peaceful Gulf of St. Lawrence”. 

Elliston-based Great War committee to bury time capsule for 100th anniversary commemoration 

http://www.thepacket.ca/News/Local/2016-06-09/article-4552133/Elliston-based-Great-War-committee-to-bury-time-capsule-for-100th-anniversary-commemoration/1 

With the 100th anniversary of the battle of Beaumont Hamel in the First World War on July 1, a local war commemoration committee is looking to remember the event by creating some history of their own. 

Nova Scotia 

Viola Desmond family documents donated to Beaton Institute 

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/nova-scotia/viola-desmond-wanda-robson-beaton-institute-archives-documents-1.3620481 

The youngest sister of Canadian civil rights icon Viola Desmond has donated her collection of family documents to the Beaton Institute of Cape Breton University. 

New Brunswick 

Phenomenal war exhibit on display in Oromocto 

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/new-brunswick/nb-oromocto-war-display-1.3617313 

A new display has opened at the New Brunswick Military History Museum in Oromocto, just ahead of the 72nd anniversary of D-Day. 

From Vimy to D-Day is travelling across the country to highlight Canada's involvement in both World Wars. 

Ontario 

JOY OF GENEALOGY: Newspapers can provide surprising family stories 

http://www.insidetoronto.com/news-story/6706232-joy-of-genealogy-newspapers-can-provide-surprising-family-stories/ 

Genealogists seem to forget or simply ignore newspapers as a great source of knowledge. 

The R.B. Bennett statue is in town. Let's get it to Parliament Hill 

http://ottawacitizen.com/opinion/columnists/boyko-the-r-b-bennett-statue-is-in-town-lets-get-it-to-parliament-hill 

Bennett was an engaged citizen. He was a city councillor, territorial representative, a member of Alberta’s provincial legislature, then founding leader of the Alberta Conservative Party. He won a federal seat and served in Robert Borden’s cabinet. In 1927 he became leader of the federal Tories and, in 1930, Canada’s prime minister. 

Corduroy road likely one of Waterloo's first-ever European built roads 

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/kitchener-waterloo/corduroy-road-represents-waterloos-early-beginings-1.3516984 

A corduroy road unearthed by construction crews on King Street in Uptown Waterloo dates back two centuries and is likely one of the first ever roads built by Euro-Canadian settlers in the region, according to a senior archaeologist. 

Saskatchewan 

History Matters: Metis once not counted in census 

http://thestarphoenix.com/opinion/columnists/history-matters-metis-once-not-counted-in-census 

It’s census time again. Statistics Canada is counting heads, as well as gathering other information that will be invaluable for planning and future genealogical historical research.

British Columbia 

In defence of history: Fred Soofi's crusade to save Port Moody's old homes 

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/british-columbia/in-defence-of-history-fred-soofi-s-crusade-to-save-port-moody-s-old-homes-1.3618146 

The arrival of the Evergreen SkyTrain line and accompanying condo boom means an uncertain future for many of Port Moody's historical homes. 

Canadian Stories this Week 

New Courses on Ancestry Academy


Do you know that the Ancestry Academy’s online course library continues to grow? Not only do they have four new full-length courses, but they have added a variety of short Getting Started and beginner videos—with more to come each month!


These shorter videos are accessible from the Ancestry Academy home page, as well as through links on relevant pages of the Ancestry website and its related product sites, Fold3 and Newspapers.com.


I noted that Ancestry was the sponsor of the in-between videos of the live streaming at last weekend's Jamboree, and they were very good.


The three new videos that may interest you are -


Discovering the History of Your House on Ancestry, with Marian Pierre-Louis


Family History: Putting the Pieces Together, with Donna M. Moughty 


Behind the Scenes: The Science Behind AncestryDNA Results, with Catherine A. Ball, PhD 


They are on https://www.ancestry.com/Academy/courses/recommended 


There is more news from Ancestry this past week, when they released a press release to say that the Archives of Ontario is pleased to announce a partnership with Ancestry.ca to provide online access to Ontario's Vital Statistics records. 


Ancestry.ca will digitize and index original Vital Statistics records as they are transferred from the Registrar General's office to the Archives of Ontario and provide online access to these records on their website Ancestry.ca. 


All of these digitized records will be made available on the Ancestry.ca website for free in the Archives of Ontario Reading Room as well as in all public libraries across Ontario.

As of June 4, marriages from 1933 and 1934, and deaths from 1943 are available on Ancestry.ca website.
Also, deaths from 1944 will be released later this year.
Please note that the 1869-1911 births, 1869-1927 marriages and 1869-1937 deaths continue to be available on the Family Search website at https://familysearch.org.
Blogs

The question I have been asking lately  - “Is blogging dead?”  - raised it's ugly head again.
Randy Seaver, a blogger whose blog is Genea-Musings, noted at the Jamboree in Burbank last weekend that it was “the first one without a Blogger panel or special event of some sort”, and Louis Kessler's with his Behold Genealogy blog had seven blogs, including his own. 1,2
So what do you think? I read blogs, Facebook, and Google Alerts because it is part of my job, but I wonder how many other people do. I see the same people at these places, and not many new people with Blogs, or on Facebook. 
1. Randy Seaver, Ten Takeaways From the #SCGS2016 Genealogy Jamboree blog post, June 7, 2016; (http://www.geneamusings.com/: accessed 08 June 2016), Genea-Musings.
2 Louis Kessler, The OGS 2016 Conference Blog Compendium, June 7, 2016;
(http://www.beholdgenealogy.com/blog/?p=1734: accessed 09 June 2016), Behold Genealogy.

South Shore Genealogical Club
A friend of ours, Cheryl Lamerson, of the South Shore Genealogical Club in Lunenburg, Nova Scotia, is opening a new SSGS Research Centre on Saturday, 11 June between 1 and 4.

Their new research centre is at the Lunenburg Academy, Room 203 and the ribbon cutting is at 2 pm.

They have been busy moving in their archives, setting them up, and preparing the materials for the opening day.

If you are in the area, be sure to drop by the opening. Or if you have an ancestor in the Lunenburg area, but cannot get to the place, you can contact them at http://ssgs.ca/our-holdings/

The website of the SSGC is at http://ssgs.ca/

And that was the week in Canadian news!
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