Showing posts with label Library and Archives Canada. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Library and Archives Canada. Show all posts

Tuesday, May 19, 2015

LAC will hold a Town Hall meeting



The Library and Archives Canada (LAC) is holding a Town Hall meeting on June 1, 2015 between 7:00 p.m. and 9:00 p.m. at 395 Wellington Street, Ottawa. They are interested in hearing from clients that currently use, or plan to use its services onsite, on the website or by telephone - that means genealogists!

It is limited to a maximum of 100 persons, and will be allotted on a first come first serve basis. The email to reserve a seat is by email: rsvp@bac-lac.gc.ca, and you should register by May 22, 2015.

I won’t be going to the Town Meeting but my husband will, and it will be interesting to see what will be discussed.

In the meantime, the transcript of the speech that was given by Dr. Guy Berthiaume, Librarian and Archivist of Canada to the Friends of the City of Ottawa Archives on April 30th called Something old, something new: access and the heart of LAC's mandate is at http://news.gc.ca/web/article-en.do?mthd=tp&crtr.page=1&nid=973169&crtr.tp1D=970

The website for the LAC is at http://www.bac-lac.gc.ca/eng/Pages/home.aspx

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SPECIAL OFFER!!!!!!!!!

Need help in finding your Canadian ancestors?

As a nod of the hat to the Ontario Genealogical Conference being held in Barrie, Ontario from May 29 to May 31, may we take this opportunity to offer a month-long discount on our research and consultation services of 15% (ends 11 June at midnight).

Just go to Elizabeth Lapointe Research Services at www.elrs.biz, or send an email with the subject "special" to genealogyresearch@aol.com to see how I can help you find that elusive Canadian ancestor!
 
Research Tip! If you want a place to start your genealogy research, read “What to do First” at http://www.bac-lac.gc.ca/eng/discover/genealogy/how-to-begin/Pages/what-to-do-first.aspx 
 
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Check the Canadian Week in Review every Monday morning for the latest in Genealogy, Heritage, and History news in Canada.

If you missed this week’s edition, it is at http://genealogycanada.blogspot.com/2015/05/canadian-week-in-review-11-may-2015.html
 
It’s the ONLY news blog of its kind in Canada.
 

Friday, May 15, 2015

UPDATE! LAC adds more service files online


As of today, 155,110 of 640,000 service files are available online, and you can see them by going to the Soldiers of the First World War: 1914-1918 database at http://www.bac-lac.gc.ca/eng/discover/military-heritage/first-world-war/first-world-war-1914-1918-cef/Pages/canadian-expeditionary-force.aspx.

Library and Archives Canada is digitizing the service files systematically, from box 1 to box 10686, which roughly corresponds to alphabetical order.

The latest digitized box is #3518, which corresponds to the surname “Gilbert”

Please visit the Digitization of the Canadian Expedition Force Service Files at http://www.bac-lac.gc.ca/eng/discover/military-heritage/Pages/digitization-cef-service-files.aspx for more details on the digitization project.

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SPECIAL OFFER!!!!!!!!!

Need help in finding your Canadian ancestors?

As a nod of the hat to the Ontario Genealogical Conference being held in Barrie, Ontario from May 29 to May 31, may we take this opportunity to offer a month-long discount on our research and consultation services of 15% (ends 11 June at midnight).

Just go to Elizabeth Lapointe Research Services at www.elrs.biz, or send an email with the subject "special" to genealogyresearch@aol.com to see how I can help you find that elusive Canadian ancestor!
 
Research Tip! Please note that over the years, the content of some boxes of the Soldiers of the First World War; 1914-1918 has had to be moved and, you might find that the file you want, with a surname that is supposed to have been digitized, is now located in another box that has not yet been digitized. You should phone the LAC at 1-866-578-7777 for more information.    
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Check the Canadian Week in Review every Monday morning for the latest in Genealogy, Heritage, and History news in Canada.

If you missed this week’s edition, it is at http://genealogycanada.blogspot.com/2015/05/canadian-week-in-review-11-may-2015.html
 
It’s the ONLY news blog of its kind in Canada

Friday, May 1, 2015

100th anniversary of the poem In Flanders Fields

In Flanders fields the poppies blow
Between the crosses, row on row,
That mark our place; and in the sky
The larks, still bravely singing, fly
Scarce heard amid the guns below.


In Flanders Fields, John McCrae (1872-1918)

The year 2015 marks the 100th anniversary of the poem In Flanders Fields, which was written by Canadian physician Lieutenant Colonel John McCrae amid the horrors of the Second Battle of Ypres in May 1915.

The Library and Archives Canada (LAC) has honoured McCrae by releasing a blog posting  about the poem – how it was never really proven how it got printed in Punch in December 1915 (did he send it or someone else send it, for example).

The LAC has one of the copies on hand at the archives, and you can see the copy if you go to the blog at http://thediscoverblog.com/2015/04/30/100th-anniversary-of-the-composition-of-the-iconic-poem-in-flanders-fields/

Additionally, the Royal Canadian Mint has minted 1,500 5 oz. Fine Silver Coloured Coin to honour Lieutenant Colonel John McCrae and the poem.

You can visit the McCrae’s home in Guelph at http://guelph.ca/museum/?page_id=186plus, there will be a statue of him unveiled on June 25th in Guelph.



Check the Canadian Week in Review every Monday morning for the latest in Genealogy, Heritage, and History news in Canada.
 
 
It’s the ONLY news blog of its kind in Canada!
 
It has been a regular post every Monday morning since April 23, 2012

Thursday, April 16, 2015

BRAVO! The LAC has listened …

Attestation Paper for Thomas Cussons, regimental no. 675270, Canadian Expeditionary Force personnel files, RG 150, accession number Accession 1992-93/166, Box 2057 – 51; (http://www.bac-lac.gc.ca/eng/discover/military-heritage/first-world-war/first-world-war-1914-1918-cef/Pages/image.aspx?Image=073302a&URLjpg=http%3a%2f%2fdata2.archives.ca%2fcef%2fgat1%2f073302a.gif&Ecopy=073302a); accessed 15 April 2015); Library and Archives Canada, Ottawa, Canada.

The Library and Archives Canada (LAC) today released the latest news on digitizing the First World War Service files. Not only did they say that 143,613 of 640,000 files are available online via their Soldiers of the First World War: 1914-1918 website, but for the first time, they have released the surnames of the soldiers that they have digitized. 

Thank heavens! It was a never-ending guessing game whether I should go ahead and request a file, and go to the LAC and take photos of the record, or view it online. I never knew which I should do.

But I had written to them a month ago and asked them if they would tell us where they are on the digitizing scheme of things, and now they have. So bravo to the LAC!

The latest digitized box is #2057, which corresponds to the surname Thomas Cussons. I looked up the name, and it is there – the full service record!

So, hopefully, this little addition to the LAC blog will make a difference to researchers out there. Now I must write a letter of “Thanks” to the people who are working on the boxes.

The website for the First World War Service files is http://www.bac-lac.gc.ca/eng/discover/military-heritage/first-world-war/first-world-war-1914-1918-cef/Pages/canadian-expeditionary-force.aspx



Check the Canadian Week in Review every Monday morning for the latest in Genealogy, Heritage, and History news in Canada.

If you missed this week’s edition, it is at http://genealogycanada.blogspot.com/2015/04/canadian-week-in-review-13-april-2015_13.html

It’s the ONLY news blog of its kind in Canada!

It has been a regular post every Monday morning since April 23, 2012/

Sunday, March 29, 2015

Immigration Photos on Flickr

Canada is a nation made up of people from other countries. The diversity in its population distinguishes it from most other counties, and gives Canadians an unique view of genealogy – we are always looking over the seas for our ancestors.

And the Library and Archives Canada is the keeper of our papers, books, records, and if we want to learn about the different ethno-cultural groups, we can either go to their site at http://www.bac-lac.gc.ca/eng/discover/Pages/ethno-cultural-groups.aspx and take a short history lesson of the following immigrants groups - Acadian, Blacks. British, Chinese, Danish, Doukhobors, Dutch, East Indian, Finnish, French, German, Greek, Hungarian, Icelandic, Irish, Italian, Japanese, Jews, Mennonites, Norwegian, Polish, Russian, Scottish, Swedish, Ukranian, and Welsh.

Or you can check out the immigration photos on Flickr at https://www.flickr.com/photos/lac-bac/sets/72157650749992889/#



Check the Canadian Week in Review every Monday morning for the latest in Genealogy, Heritage, and History news in Canada.

If you missed this week’s edition, it is at http://genealogycanada.blogspot.com/2015/03/canadian-week-in-review-23-march-2015_23.html

It’s the ONLY news blog of its kind in Canada!

It has been a regular post every Monday morning since April 23, 2012. 

Saturday, March 28, 2015

Digging Into the Past: Family History in Canada





In this podcast, genealogy consultants Sara Chatfield and Richard Lelièvre from Library and Archives Canada, discuss genealogy research.

The podcasts explore what genealogy is, what is involved, how to start, suggest resources to use and how Library and Archives Canada can help you with your genealogy research.

Subscribe to their podcast episodes using RSS or iTunes, or if you don’t want to listen to the podcasts, but prefer to read a transcript of the conversation, it is online at http://www.bac-lac.gc.ca/eng/news/podcasts/Pages/family-history-canada.aspx



Check the Canadian Week in Review every Monday morning for the latest in Genealogy, Heritage, and History news in Canada.

If you missed this week’s edition, it is at http://genealogycanada.blogspot.com/2015/03/canadian-week-in-review-23-march-2015_23.html

It’s the ONLY news blog of its kind in Canada!

It has been a regular post every Monday morning since April 23, 2012.

Tuesday, March 17, 2015

Ever been to the 'library' at the Library and Archives Canada?





Have you ever been to the ‘library’ of the Genealogy and Family History Room on the third floor of the Library and Archives Canada building at 365 Wellington Street, Ottawa? 
 
If you haven’t been there, why not stop in the next time you are in Ottawa? It has many books in it's stacks that may interest you in your pursue of Canadian family history.  
 
They recently received more books under the following headings, such as - 
 
Family Histories 
 
Le grand rassemblement...: familles Zéphirina Dupuis, Aquila Dupuis, André-Joseph Dupuis: généalogie et biographie by Francine Dupuis Loranger 
 
Mes ancêtres Laroche et Desrochers by Lyne Laroche 
 
The Melanson story: Acadian family, Acadian times by Margaret C. Melanson 
 
Une famille, un village, un pays : les Gagnon, les Bergeronnes, le Québec by Rodolphe Gagnon 
 
Ethnic and Local Histories 
 
Cartes mortuaires. Les Éboulements et Saint-Joseph-de-la-Rive by Alain Anctil-Tremblay, Jean-Philippe Tremblay 
 
Cimetières La Malbaie by Alain Anctil-Tremblay, Jean-Philippe Tremblay 
 
Cimetières Les Éboulements, 1733-2010 et Saint-Joseph-de-la Rive, 1932-2010 by Alain Anctil-Tremblay, Jean-Philippe Tremblay 
 
Familles Caron d'Amérique: répertoire généalogique by the Association les familles Caron d'Amérique 
 
Généalogie des familles acadiennes de l'Île-du-Prince-Édouard (volume 5) by Jean Bernard 
 
Gravestones of Glengarry (volumes 10 to 14) by Alex W. Fraser

To see what hours they are open, or to ask a question, go to http://www.bac-lac.gc.ca/eng/discover/genealogy/Pages/introduction.aspx
 


Check the Canadian Week in Review every Monday morning for the latest in Genealogy, Heritage, and History news in Canada.

If you missed last week’s edition, it is at http://genealogycanada.blogspot.com/2015/03/canadian-week-in-review-16-march-2015.html
 
It’s the ONLY news blog of its kind in Canada!

It has been a regular post every Monday morning since April 23, 2012.

 

Saturday, March 14, 2015

Irish Research


 A good place to start researching the Irish who came to Canada, is the Library and Archives Canada site at http://www.bac-lac.gc.ca/eng/discover/immigration/history-ethnic-cultural/Pages/irish.aspx 
 
They say that ‘Canada's most recent census returns list the Irish as the fourth largest ethnic group in Canada with almost four and a half million Canadians claiming either some or full Irish lineage. Indeed, this bond between Canada and Ireland has been in existence for centuries’.

At this site, they have the Genealogy and Family History section, where they list under the headings of Research at Library and Archives Canada, Research in Published Sources, and Research at Other Insitutions and Online sources that may hold answer to your Irish research. 

So if you have Irish anscestors, this may be a good place to start your Irish research.



Check the Canadian Week in Review every Monday morning for the latest in Genealogy, Heritage, and History news in Canada.

If you missed this week’s edition, it is at http://genealogycanada.blogspot.com/2015/03/canadian-news-in-review-09-march-2015.html

It’s the ONLY news blog of its kind in Canada!
It has been a regular post every Monday morning since
April 23, 2012.

Saturday, March 7, 2015

Canadian tourism photos on Flickr


How many photos do you have in your family genealogy of Canadian vacations? Did you know the the Library and Archives Canada has travel photod too, and now are putting some of them on Flickr.

The press release says that -

The concept of Canadian tourism emerged during the early nineteenth century. Improved modes of transportation, such as new railways stretching across the country, facilitated leisure travel and offered people the chance to witness some of the nation’s greatest marvels and modern achievements.

'Photographs were the ideal medium with which to attract potential visitors, and photographers were hired by transportation companies to produce images of majestic scenery that would promote destinations. Later rivaled by amateur picture-takers, eager to create their personal holiday mementos, these photographs were a vital component of the burgeoning tourist industry. The imagery created during this period helped to characterize the country, establishing a sense of national identity by introducing viewers to iconic images of Canadian scenery'.

The website is at https://www.flickr.com/photos/lac-bac/sets/72157650719659971/

And for people who will travel to Ottawa in the coming months, visit the National Gallery of Canada to see the photos exhibit from March 6 to August 30, 2015.

Tuesday, March 3, 2015

Library and Archives Canada - online survey


 
Sylvie Tremblay, Manager, Online Content of the Library and Archives Canada (LAC), has sent out the following press release -

Library and Archives Canada is conducting a usability study of our to gather information about how visitors use our website. This study includes a question about digital content available on the LAC website. Please note that the identity of respondents is strictly confidential’.

The study can be accessed at: http://fluidsurveys.com/surveys/lacbac01/lac/ until March 6th.

If you have any questions about the study, please contact: webservices@bac-lac.gc.ca.

So I took the survey, and found that they asked very good questions, such as how did you find the LAC website and what (records) were you searching for today?

The questions caused me to think, and the two things that I would like to see added would be the 1851, 1861 and 1871 agricultural census and the vast collection of newspapers that they have onsite. Whether they will accommodate my wish list remains to be seen.

What did you think of the survey? What would you like to see in the future as far as digital content is concerned? Are there questions that they should have asked, and didn’t?


Check the Canadian Week in Review every Monday morning for the latest in Genealogy, Heritage, and History news in Canada.

If you missed this week’s edition, it is at http://genealogycanada.blogspot.com/2015/03/canadian-week-in-review.html
 It’s the ONLY news blog of its kind in Canada!

It has been a regular post every Monday morning since
April 23, 2012.
           
        

Friday, February 20, 2015

Want to see Canadian industrial artwork?



Today I came across some beautiful Canadian artwork that was put out there in form of posters from the Empire Marketing Board (EMB) that existed in the county from 1926 to 1933.

It was set up by the government to promote intra-Empire trade and to persuade consumers to 'Buy Empire'. It was later replaced by the Imperial Preference which was a proposed system of tariffs ot free-trade agreements between the countries of the British Empire. 

There were more than 800 poster designs produced and displayed in train stations, schools, shops and factories. The EMB visited schools, managed a library, produced around 100 films, as well as organized lectures, radio broadcasts and exhibitions.

Now some of the poster has been put online at the LAC Flickr page at https://www.flickr.com/photos/lac-bac/sets/72157649863392650/#



Check the Canadian Week in Review every Monday morning for the latest in Genealogy, Heritage, and History news in Canada.

If you missed this week’s edition, it is at http://genealogycanada.blogspot.com/2015/02/canadfian-news-in-review-16-february.html

It’s the ONLY news blog of its kind in Canada!

It has been a regular post every Monday morning since April 23, 2012.

Thursday, January 29, 2015

LAC updates city directories online

Montreal Directories 1842-1843 page 213

WOW! I went to genealogy heaven this morning with news from Library and Archives Canada (LAC)!

The LAC now has the digitized directories for the following Ontario cities and counties in PDF format -
  • City of Hamilton 1853-1895
  • City of Kingston 1865-1906
  • City of London 1875-1899
  • Southwestern Ontario counties (the counties of Haldimand, Lincoln, Welland, Wentworth, Huron, Middlesex, Perth, and so forth) for various years from 1864 to 1899.
They are listed on this webpage http://www.bac-lac.gc.ca/eng/discover/directories-collection/Pages/directories-collection-available-editions.aspx#a

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Check the Canadian Week in Review every Monday morning for the latest in Genealogy, Heritage, and History news in Canada.

If you missed this week’s edition, it is at http://genealogycanada.blogspot.com/2015/01/canadian-week-in-review-26-january-2015.html

It’s the ONLY news blog of its kind in Canada!

It has been a regular post every Monday morning since April 23, 2012.

Thursday, October 23, 2014

Library and Archives Canada: Announces two new guide



The following is the notice that I received from the Library and Archives this morning –

“Canada is pleased to announce the launch of two new guides: Guide to Sources Relating to the Canadian Militia, 1855–1988 and Guide to Sources Relating to Canadian Naval Vessels, 1909–1983. The guides were originally compiled over many years by the late Barbara Wilson (1931–2014), an archivist with the former National Archives of Canada, now Library and Archives Canada. 

Guide to Sources Relating to the Canadian Militia, 1855–1988 

This guide is an indispensable starting point for researching the records that document Canadian militia units. It is a unique finding aid that brings together, by militia unit name, references to records and files scattered throughout several different archival fonds held at Library and Archives Canada.

Guide to Sources Relating to Canadian Naval Vessels, 1909–1983

This guide is an indispensable starting point for researching the records documenting Canadian naval vessels that served with the Royal Canadian Navy. It is a unique finding aid that brings together—by ship’s name—references to records and files scattered throughout several different volumes of archival fonds of the Department of National Defence."

The Website is located at http://www.bac-lac.gc.ca/eng/discover/military-heritage/Pages/guide-sources-canadian-naval-vessels.aspx 

Thursday, September 25, 2014

The Library and Archives Canada has digitized the War Diaries of the First World War

As the LAC say, these dairies of the “Canadian Expeditionary Force (CEF) units were required to maintain a daily account of their "Actions in the Field." This log was called a War Diary. 

This database contains the digitized War Diaries of CEF infantry, artillery and cavalry units, Brigade, Division and Corps commands and support units such as Railway and Forestry troops. The site also includes the War Diaries of the Royal Newfoundland Regiment and several British units that served under Canadian command.”

To read about the war diaries, go to http://www.bac-lac.gc.ca/eng/discover/military-heritage/first-world-war/Pages/war-diaries.aspx#b 

Wednesday, August 13, 2014

LAC has updated the 1861 Census

Library and Archives Canada has upgraded the 1861 Census because there were apparently a “number of missing records and misplaced images were reported by Library and Archives Canada clients and staff". 

They have corrected over 133,000 entries! 

According to their blog, there were definite issues with the Canada West and Canada East.  

“In Canada West, the records for the cities of Hamilton, Kingston, London, Ottawa and Toronto were previously reported missing but the records did exist. The five cities, although enumerated separately in 1861, were tucked away amongst their neighbouring rural districts. For example, the city of Ottawa was listed under the district of Carleton and the city of Kingston was listed under Frontenac. The five cities are now correctly identified as districts and their respective wards are identified as sub-districts. 

Additionally in Canada West, the rural districts of Renfrew and Russell were also reported as missing. The records for those two districts and their sub-districts can now be searched. In the rural district of Kent, the sub-districts of Camden and Gore, the town of Chatham, and the district of Chatham have been correctly identified. The images in the districts of Brant and Dundas are now correctly linked.

In Canada East, several image linking errors were corrected, particularly in the districts of Argenteuil, Montcalm and St-Jean”.

It is good to see that the LAC is listening to our comments, complaints and they are correcting their databases. 

To go to the 1861 census, you can go to 

Wednesday, July 23, 2014

Ancestry Update: South African War Land Grants, 1908-1910

Ancestry.ca has added a new historical record -

“During the South African War (or Boer War) of 1899–1902, for the first time, Canada sent troops to fight in a war overseas. About 7,300 Canadian troops and 12 nurses served in South Africa. Veterans of the war were became eligible for 320 acres of Dominion Land (or a payment of $160 in scrip) under the 1908 Volunteer Bounty Act.

This database contains applications for these bounty land grants. Applications typically include the following details:

· name

· gender

· service start date, location

· residence

· death date

· place of death

· age at death

· birth date

· birth place

· regiment

The applications are two pages long, so be sure to page forward to see the entire record.” 

One thing I did notice is that in some applicant’s forms, there are notes that you may finding helpful, and the date range of service is there also. 


The records are in the Library and Archives Canada, under the citation of Department of Veterans Affairs. Soldiers of the South African War, Land Grant Applications. Record Group 38 (vols. 117-136). Library and Archives Canada, Ottawa, Ontario.

Friday, July 11, 2014

LAC: Soundex - How to find spelling variations of a surname


The Library and Archives Canada explains how to use the JOS Soundex code to find information on names that are difficult to find because of the way that they are spelled. 
They say that “Many American archival records have been indexed using this system. It’s a way to search surnames while ignoring minor differences in spelling. The code uses the first letter of the surname, followed by three numbers associated with the sound of the name. 
Letters of the alphabet are assigned a number (0 to 9). Vowels (A, E, I, O, U and Y) and the letters H and W are not considered. Also, if the same letter occurs twice in a row in the name, it is counted only once (e.g., Lloyd becomes Loyd). If there are fewer than 3 letters in the name, 0 is used for the last digit.” 
To help you identify different spellings of surnames, we suggest that you use the following Soundex indexing site: Avotaynu Consolidated Jewish Surname Index at http://www.avotaynu.com/csi/csi-home.htm. It can also be used for non-Jewish surnames. To help you identify the Soundex code, you can use the JOS Soundex calculator found at http://www.jewishgen.org/JOS/jossound.htm.
So, speaking of ways to make genealogy research easier for you, have you entered the Canada Day Brick Wall Contest? This is the second year that I have had the contest and it closes at 6:00 a.m. EST on Tuesday, July 15th.
You can go to the website and get the details http://genealogycanada.blogspot.com/2014/07/happy-canada-day.html and get the details.
GOOD LUCK!  

Wednesday, June 11, 2014

Library and Archives Canada releases an updated version of the Immigrants from China database


Credit: Library and Archives Canada

Last month was Asian Heritage Month, and the Library and Archives Canada (LAC) updated their database to include references to the C.I.9 certificates issued to people of Chinese origin born in Canada and wanting to leave Canada for a limited time without losing their Canadian status.

If your ancestors are from China, you may want to view the adjusted database.

Here is the press release that was released by the LAC at the end of May -

“May is Asian Heritage Month in Canada, during which we acknowledge the long and rich history of Asian Canadians and their contributions to Canada. Asian Heritage Month also provides an opportunity for Canadians across the country to reflect on and celebrate the contributions of Canadians of Asian heritage to the growth and prosperity of Canada.

To celebrate Asian culture, Library and Archives Canada (LAC) is pleased to announce the addition of references to its Immigrants from China database. It now includes references to the C.I.9 certificates issued to people of Chinese origin born in Canada and wanting to leave Canada for a limited time without losing their Canadian status. The actual records include a photograph and provide information such as the individual’s name, age and place of birth, as well as the port and date of departure, and the ship’s name.”

Chinese immigrants who arrived in Canada between 1885 and 1949 are in the database is fully explained on the website at http://www.bac-lac.gc.ca/eng/discover/immigration/immigration-records/immigrants-china-1885-1949/Pages/introduction.aspx

Wednesday, May 28, 2014

Underwater Canada: A Researcher’s Brief Guide to Shipwrecks

If you are researching a shipwreck in your genealogy, the Library and Archives Canada (LAC) has released pointers on how to use their records to do the research - 

Shipwrecks, both as historical events and artifacts, have sparked the imagination and an interest in the maritime heritage of Canada. The discovery of the War of 1812 wrecks Hamilton and Scourge, found in Lake Ontario in the 1970s, and the discovery of the Titanic in the 1980s, served to heighten public awareness of underwater archaeology and history. 

Whether you are a wreck hunter on the trail of a lost vessel, or a new shipwreck enthusiast eager to explore images and documents that preserve the epic tales of Canadian waters, Library and Archives Canada (LAC) has something for you.

Starting your research 

First, gather as much information as possible about the shipwreck(s) you are researching. Specifically, you will ideally want to obtain the following information (in order of importance):

· Name of Vessel

· Location of accident

· Date of accident

· Ship’s port of registry

· Ship’s official number

· Year of vessel’s construction 

The Ship Registration Index at http://www.collectionscanada.gc.ca/databases/ship-registration/index-e.html?PHPSESSID=7g9h5km4d9l7l0krorlhh9n9s5 is a helpful resource. The database includes basic information about more than 78,000 ships registered in ports of Canada between 1787 and 1966. 

Can’t locate all of the information listed? There’s no cause for concern! Not all of the information is necessary, but it is essential that you know the name of the vessel. All Government records relating to shipwrecks are organized according to the ship’s name.

What is Available?

Using Archives Search at http://www.collectionscanada.gc.ca/lac-bac/search/arch , you can locate the following types of material:

Photographs

· Consult the How to Find Photographs Online article for more help.

Maps

· In Archives Search, under “Type of material”, select “Maps and cartographic material” to narrow your results.
Government Records 

All records listed are found in the documents of the Marine Branch (Record Group 42) and/or Transport Canada (Record Group 24). Official Wreck Registers, 1870‒1975

· Wreck Reports, 1907‒1974

· Register of Investigations into Wrecks, 1911‒1960

· Marine Casualty Investigation Records, 1887‒1980

Important: Government records contain information about shipwrecks that occurred in Canadian waters, and include all accidents involving foreign vessels in Canadian waters.

Please note: this is not an exhaustive list of resources, but rather a compilation of some of the major sources of documentation available on shipwrecks held at LAC.

Helpful Hints 

You can find a number of digitized photographs, maps and documents on the Shipwreck Investigations virtual exhibition at http://www.lac-bac.gc.ca/sos/shipwrecks/index-e.html. More specifically, check out the collection of digitized Official Wreck Registers in the Shipwreck Investigations Database. Simply check if the name of the vessel you are researching is listed.

Another excellent source of information on shipwrecks is local public libraries. There are many maritime histories and bibliographies that offer reference points to begin your shipwreck research.


Tuesday, March 25, 2014

LAC’s new code of conduct/ Nouveau code de conduite de BAC

Some good news this morning -

Political pressure sometimes works. In a victory for staff, Library and Archives Canada (LAC) has withdrawn its controversial Code of Conduct put into effect in early 2013. The code contained severe restrictions on staff behavior, both in their public and personal lives.

The restrictions on LAC employees garnered media and public scrutiny and, in the wake of intense public pressure, LAC administrators placed the code under review. In December 2013, a revised Code was introduced.

This new code represents a significant improvement. Employees are still encouraged to report on their colleagues for any failure to comply with the code, a shameful policy that contributes to an unhealthy workplace. However, restrictions on employees’ professional development activities have been substantially reduced and references to discipline for personal opinions expressed in limited access forums have been removed.

At a time when Canadian culture institutions are being decimated, it is easy to become overwhelmed and forget to celebrate our victories, however small. The changes to the LAC code of conduct were only made because we spoke out collectively, an example of how we can make a difference. Our current government may be attempting to rewrite the past, but together we are in control of the future. 
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Les pressions politiques portent parfois leurs fruits. Bibliothèque et Archives Canada (BAC) a retiré son controversé Code de conduite entré en vigueur au début de 2013, une victoire pour le personnel de l’institution. Le code imposait de sévères restrictions aux activités tant publiques que personnelles des employés. 

Les restrictions imposées aux employés de BAC avaient suscité l’intérêt des médias et du public, et donné lieu à des protestations publiques qui forçaient les administrateurs de BAC à le réexaminer. En décembre 2013, BAC adoptait une version révisée du Code.

Le nouveau code constitue une nette amélioration par rapport à la version antérieure. Les employés sont toujours invités à signaler à l’employeur les activités de leurs collègues contraires au code, une mesure honteuse qui contribue à la détérioration des relations de travail. Cependant, BAC a considérablement assoupli les règles régissant les activités de perfectionnement professionnel des employés et a éliminé toute mention de mesures disciplinaires pour l’expression d’opinions personnelles dans des forums à accès public. 

En cette période où les institutions culturelles canadiennes sont décimées, on oublie facilement, dans notre accablement, de célébrer nos victoires, aussi petites soient-elles. Si BAC a modifié son code de conduite, c’est parce que nous avons protesté collectivement. Voilà un exemple de notre capacité à faire bouger les choses. Le gouvernement actuel peut bien essayer de réécrire le passé, mais ensemble, nous forgeons l’avenir. 

Rosa E. Barker 

Professional Officer / Agente professionnelle 

Canadian Association of University Teachers / Association canadienne des professeures et professeurs d'université 

2705 promenade Queensview Drive 

Ottawa ON, K2B 8K2 

Tel / tél 613-726-5166

Fax/ télé 613-820-7244